Archive for the ‘NWPMAG’ Category

Sherri Ballman – NWPMAG Member

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

Eastern Washington artist Sherri Ballman loves to use papier mache to express her artistic ideas. Whether her sculptures are just for fun, or designed to make one think, she takes pleasure in the fact that she’s using materials that, if not used in her artwork, would probably end up in a landfill. These materials include old tools and broken machines, along with various kinds of papers. She blends a variety of textures and paint to make her sculptures more realistic and homogenous. Sherri enjoys transforming “junk” into beautiful works of art that will be valued for many generations.

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Sherri Ballman-"Tarnished Torso"-16x8x8 inches

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Sherri Ballman-"Not Forgotten"-19x24x9 inches

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Sherri Ballman-"Ki"-memorial urn

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Sherri Ballman-"Ki"-memorial urn-back view

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Sherri Ballman-"Simon"-detail

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Sherri Ballman-“Shire”-38x16x5 inches

                                       To see more of Sherri Ballman’s work link to http://www.rheagiffin.com/Ballman.htm or select NWPMAG link from menu on top of this page.

Awards for Papier Mâché/Mixed Media Artworks

Tuesday, August 4th, 2009

Rhea Giffin’s “Bobbing for Answers” receives the Opal Brooten Purchase Award as well as a cash prize Juried Art Show Honorarium from Citizens Council for the Arts at this year’s 41st Annual Art on the Green.  The artwork selection is being donated to Borah Elementary School.  It is one of three purchase awards that are donated to public buildings in the community.  Judges are internationally renowned artists Terry Lee and Ken Spiering.  Judy Minter, another Northwest Papier Mâché Artists’ Guild member, received two honorarium cash prizes this year.  One for her mixed-media/papier mâché sculpture “100% Natural” and one for a painting titled “Graffitti.”  Judy is also the recipient of a previous year’s purchase award for a papier mâché wall sculpture that was donated to North Idaho College’s permanent collection.  For more information, visit http://www.ArtontheGreen.org

Sandpiper Art Gallery features Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild – Polson, Montana

Sunday, July 12th, 2009

 

Exhibit runs July 31 – September 5, 2009

Featuring the artwork of guild members: 

  • Sherri Ballman
  • Lisa Conger
  • Betty Gardner
  • Rhea Giffin
  • Dara Harvey
  • Scott Hill
  • Connie Janney
  • Judy Minter
  • Jennifer Ogden
  • Larry Thomas

www.sandpiperartgallery.com

Things That Go Bump in the Night – Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery, Sandpoint, Idaho

Sunday, July 12th, 2009

 

 

See the works of Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild Members: Betty Gardner, Judy Minter and Leata Judd

Exhibit runs June 12 – July 27, 2009

POAC Gallery at the Old Power House, 120 E. Lake Street, Sandpoint, Idaho Information: (208) 263-6139, poac@sandpoint.net  www.artinsandpoint.org

A Fond Farewell to Our Friend and Co-Founder

Friday, March 13th, 2009

Melissa Swann Wagner, co-founder of the Northwest Papier Mâché Artists’ Guild and an accomplished artist in many mediums passed away last week.  We are grateful for knowing her and for her generous contributions to the guild.  Because she touched our lives in such an artful way, the effects of that connection will live on through us!  Still, she will be missed!  (I have not yet been able to find a better or more current photo of her than this one. It features our guild exhibit at Whitworth’s Kohler Gallery http://www.whitworth.edu/ many years ago.  Melissa is in the center wearing a white vest.  The reclining figure above her head is her piece titled “The Reader.”  It was purchased by and resides in the North Idaho College library with many other fine works of art you should visit if you get the chance.)North Idaho College

Melissa and other NWPMAG members and patrons at the Kohler Gallery

Melissa and other NWPMAG members and patrons at the Kohler Gallery

Link to a 2006 article about Melissa Swann Wagner in The Deer Park Dispatch http://www.deerparkdispatch.com/archive/?postID=265

Fine Arts and Crafts Holiday Sale on the South Hill

Thursday, November 13th, 2008

See fun new work by guild member, Sherri Ballman and other great northwest artists on Spokane’s South Hill, just in time for Holiday purchases!

Northern Lights, Inc. – POAC Satellite Gallery

Thursday, November 13th, 2008

September 16, 2008 – January 15, 2009, Northern Lights, Inc., Sagle, Idaho, a satellite gallery for Pend Oreille Arts Council (POAC) http://www.artinsandpoint.org Exhibit features the works of Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild members:  Sherri Ballman, Lisa Conger, Rhea Giffin, Leata Judd, Judy Minter, Larry Thomas www.rheagiffin.com/nwpmag.htm

NWPMAG Exhibit in Montana This Summer

Wednesday, November 12th, 2008

Sandpiper Art Gallery http://www.sandpiperartgallery.com has invited The Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild to exhibit in Polson, Montana July 31 – September 5, 2009.  Artists reception will be Friday, July 31st.

“About Faces: Personality in Portraiture”

Wednesday, November 12th, 2008

Many Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild members participated in this all media invitational exhibit at the POAC Gallery in Sandpoint, Idaho this summer as part of ArtWalk I, June 20-July 27, 2008. www.artinsandpoint.org

"Megan" by Sherri Ballman

"Megan" by Sherri Ballman

Thank you, Tala K.K. Wood for such an explicit and thoughtful review in the July 3, 2008 issue of The Sandpoint Reader  (page 11)

Click her to view original article (pdf)

Note: The photographed images within the article feature artwork by Judy Minter. http://www.JudyMinter.com   Also note that my last name, giffin, is mis-spelled.  The correct version has no “r”. Betty’s correct last name is Gardner, not Gardener.

Unfortunately there is not an on-line version available at this time.   Here is a transcribed version:

“Faces” Captured Me

By Tala K. K. Wood

For SPR

The “About Faces: Capturing Personality through Portraiture” exhibit at POAC’s Powerhouse Gallery was a wonder to behold.  I saw a few names I knew, and some artwork that looked familiar, but in essence, I was a stranger in a colorful land.

There were portraits of family members, famous people, and imaginary individuals. There were fascinating sculptures, and wacky carvings. Some were disturbing, with bug eyes and swirled noses, and others quaint, with children, kittens, and normal features, but every piece was interesting.

I made a complete fool of myself, walking from painting to painting about every five minutes, my mouth in danger of falling open. I am not an artsy-type person — I’m a writer, so my paints are found in dictionaries and thesauruses–but I couldn’t keep my eyes off the display of creativity I saw splashed along the hallway.

One that I liked in particular was called “Pity Stew” by Rhea Griffin. It consisted of a cup, a bowl, a spoon, and a napkin on a tray, all in a deep blue.  Accomanying it was a copy-righted poem that I fell in love with.  It turned the stew and all things asociated with soups, like salt, into ingredients for pity–little hurts, and have-nots.

Another that caught my eye was the “Beekeeper” by Betty Gardener.  The thing that intrigued me the most were the elements that made up the bust.  Wasp nests formed a neck, lichen was hair, and flowers and other plant components decorated the face.  A third eye was represented by a five-petal flower.

While I particularly liked both of these unique creations, my affection for them is out-numbered a thousand to one in favor of another of Griffin’s works, “Blind Patriotism.”

I stared at this figure for ten minutes and kept coming back even after I had–ahem–“moved on.”  Every time I looked at it, I saw a new symbol.

The basis of the piece was a blue woman in front of a three layered box with clouds on the top level and a pair of eyes perched on top.  When you look closer, you’ll see–or at least I saw–that it is covered in messages.  Note to the creator:  If my interpretations are wrong, do forgive me, I am merely an uncultured teenager.

The woman is the center piece, but even her simple movements are worth noting.  In reference to the title she is blindfolded by a scarf bearing the United States colors.  One hand is over her heart, and the other is gesturing towards the box behind her.

She is almost showing a type of possession in her posture, but at the same time, it is defensive–covering her life-source.

The world behind her is one I would not gesture to, were I in her place.

The bottom level is empty and dark, where the woman is.  The second level is a sea with high wild waves, and the third has clouds haning from strings, and one cloud that seems to have fallen.

Above the box is a pair of “All-Seeing” eyes.  The God-like half a face’s eyes are spirals, which seem to indicate a sort of madness.  To me these portions seem to indicate Hell, Earth, Sky, and Heaven.

The sides of the box are just as interesting as the insides. To the left are three American flags: the top and bottom ones are normal and right-side up, but the one that is level with the second portion of the box is upside down,. a universal signal of distress.

I find it interesting that the section that represents Earth has the distress symbol.

The Right side of the box has three identical flags of no country I recognize, each with a different icon on it.  The top one has a heart circled, equal with the “sky” portion.

The middle one, parellel with the Earth, fittingly has an Earth drawn on it.

The Earth is not shown as it normally is, with the Pacific Ocean split right down the middle.  Instead, it is only of Africa, and the bottom portion of Europe.

The third flag has a peace sign scrawled across a corner of it.  However, the peace sign is distorted and one bar is missing.  Are we missing peace, by any chance?

I found this politically slanted piece of art astounding and beguiling.  I can hardly wait to look at it again.

The entire exhibit is well worth taking some of your precious time out to see.  Maybe you’ll find your own “Blind Patriotism.”

"Blind Patriotism" and "Aquarius Rising Up From the Piscean Sea" by Rhea Giffin

Taylor-Parker Motor Co. – Sandpoint, Idaho

Wednesday, November 12th, 2008

June 20 – July 27, 2008, The Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild http://www.rheagiffin.com/nwpmag.htm  makes its debut in Sandpoint, Idaho for Artwalk I at Taylor-Parker Motors along with art quiltmaker, Sheila Mahanke Barnes.  The reception was fantastic and we were told by several sources that the town was abuzz with enthusiasm the entire five weeks.

"Thelma Goes to the Beauty Parlor" by Sherri Ballman, "Halloo Bienvenu!" by Rhea Giffin

Sherri Ballman’s “Thelma Goes to the Beauty Parlor” made the front cover full-legth full-color of the July 17, 2008, Vol.5 issue 29 of Sandpoint Reader, and an article about the guild by by reporter Tala K.K. Wood.

Click here to view original article (pdf)

Note:  The photo within the article features mixed-media marionettes by Betty Gardner.  Also note that my last name giffin, was mis-spelled. The correct way has no “r”, and all reference to “Carry Thomas” should be “Larry Thomas.”

Unfortunately there is not an on-line version at this time. Here is a transcript of the article:

Artwalk Goes Vehicular

by Tala K.K. Wood

for SPR

Paper Mache. Most of us have had the misfortune in our elementary days to have dipped our hands into that gooey mess and either loved it or hated it.

I am of the latter.  Anything that squishes between my fingers is not worth touching in my view.

But if you stop by Taylor Parker in the next few weeks, you’ll see why I have a sudden new fondness for the gunk.

The car dealership, a long-time participant in ArtWalk, are hosting the “Paper Mache Artist’s Guild.”

At first I assumed that it would appear as my disastrous sculptures from second grade would, but with creative titles and decidedly less science-leaning subjects.  But then I walked in.

You would never know these magnificent creations were made of water, flour, glue and old newspapers.  They went from pretty to unique to down-right weird.

The first time I saw the green dachshund with giant red spots and a rat-like snout, I thought his beady eyes were following me.  When I looked at him a second time, I thought he’d moved.

After scaring myself into heart-attack country, I crawled back out and away from stationary yet uncannily life-like dogs.

I moved on to pleasanter things, like “Flying Jolie Girl” by Leata Judd, in which a blue girl with wings and a dreamy expression sits on a winged blue horse with red eyes that almost seemed out of place.

I also spent some time looking for eye-candy, like “Going with the Flow” by Judy Minter, a pretty piece that had wild rainbow waves and silver-gold coral, and “Charity Changes our Perspective: by Carry Thomas.

I stared at the last piece, “Charity,” for a long time, trying to understand the title.

Finally, I understood what the turtle carrying a chair on its shell was supposed to symbolize – note to the artist: pray forgive me if I’m wrong, I am merely a member of the generation raised by the internet – the chair, decorated as it was with a sea, and islands, and even a sky, was the world, and the turtle was carrying the world on its back, much like the Native American myth.

The turtle, which in a generalization, could be called “lowly” is transformed into something grand, something that allows the rest of us to live, by “holding the world.” In its generosity, it provides for us all.

After that puzzle of a piece, I moved on, only to have my eyes drawn to an intriguing figure of a dark woman with a blue bird on her shoulder.

Her eyes were pensive, and she was cradling a huge heart-shaped crevice in one hand. Inside the heart, was an abacus-like design, with large blocks that can are turned to show different sides. The title, “Anyway,” suits Rhea Griffin’s sculpture exactly.

Each block has a semi-negative situation, and the other side tells you to keep doing what you’re doing, “anyway.”

For example, “Give the world the best you have and you may get hurt. Give the world your best anyway.”

I can’t do justice to this incredible exhibit, but I can at least beg you to go and see it.  Don’t have time? Do it anyway.