Posts Tagged ‘Judy Minter’

Awards for Papier Mâché/Mixed Media Artworks

Tuesday, August 4th, 2009

Rhea Giffin’s “Bobbing for Answers” receives the Opal Brooten Purchase Award as well as a cash prize Juried Art Show Honorarium from Citizens Council for the Arts at this year’s 41st Annual Art on the Green.  The artwork selection is being donated to Borah Elementary School.  It is one of three purchase awards that are donated to public buildings in the community.  Judges are internationally renowned artists Terry Lee and Ken Spiering.  Judy Minter, another Northwest Papier Mâché Artists’ Guild member, received two honorarium cash prizes this year.  One for her mixed-media/papier mâché sculpture “100% Natural” and one for a painting titled “Graffitti.”  Judy is also the recipient of a previous year’s purchase award for a papier mâché wall sculpture that was donated to North Idaho College’s permanent collection.  For more information, visit http://www.ArtontheGreen.org

Sandpiper Art Gallery features Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild – Polson, Montana

Sunday, July 12th, 2009

 

Exhibit runs July 31 – September 5, 2009

Featuring the artwork of guild members: 

  • Sherri Ballman
  • Lisa Conger
  • Betty Gardner
  • Rhea Giffin
  • Dara Harvey
  • Scott Hill
  • Connie Janney
  • Judy Minter
  • Jennifer Ogden
  • Larry Thomas

www.sandpiperartgallery.com

Things That Go Bump in the Night – Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery, Sandpoint, Idaho

Sunday, July 12th, 2009

 

 

See the works of Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild Members: Betty Gardner, Judy Minter and Leata Judd

Exhibit runs June 12 – July 27, 2009

POAC Gallery at the Old Power House, 120 E. Lake Street, Sandpoint, Idaho Information: (208) 263-6139, poac@sandpoint.net  www.artinsandpoint.org

Northern Lights, Inc. – POAC Satellite Gallery

Thursday, November 13th, 2008

September 16, 2008 – January 15, 2009, Northern Lights, Inc., Sagle, Idaho, a satellite gallery for Pend Oreille Arts Council (POAC) http://www.artinsandpoint.org Exhibit features the works of Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild members:  Sherri Ballman, Lisa Conger, Rhea Giffin, Leata Judd, Judy Minter, Larry Thomas www.rheagiffin.com/nwpmag.htm

Taylor-Parker Motor Co. – Sandpoint, Idaho

Wednesday, November 12th, 2008

June 20 – July 27, 2008, The Northwest Papier Mache Artists’ Guild http://www.rheagiffin.com/nwpmag.htm  makes its debut in Sandpoint, Idaho for Artwalk I at Taylor-Parker Motors along with art quiltmaker, Sheila Mahanke Barnes.  The reception was fantastic and we were told by several sources that the town was abuzz with enthusiasm the entire five weeks.

"Thelma Goes to the Beauty Parlor" by Sherri Ballman, "Halloo Bienvenu!" by Rhea Giffin

Sherri Ballman’s “Thelma Goes to the Beauty Parlor” made the front cover full-legth full-color of the July 17, 2008, Vol.5 issue 29 of Sandpoint Reader, and an article about the guild by by reporter Tala K.K. Wood.

Click here to view original article (pdf)

Note:  The photo within the article features mixed-media marionettes by Betty Gardner.  Also note that my last name giffin, was mis-spelled. The correct way has no “r”, and all reference to “Carry Thomas” should be “Larry Thomas.”

Unfortunately there is not an on-line version at this time. Here is a transcript of the article:

Artwalk Goes Vehicular

by Tala K.K. Wood

for SPR

Paper Mache. Most of us have had the misfortune in our elementary days to have dipped our hands into that gooey mess and either loved it or hated it.

I am of the latter.  Anything that squishes between my fingers is not worth touching in my view.

But if you stop by Taylor Parker in the next few weeks, you’ll see why I have a sudden new fondness for the gunk.

The car dealership, a long-time participant in ArtWalk, are hosting the “Paper Mache Artist’s Guild.”

At first I assumed that it would appear as my disastrous sculptures from second grade would, but with creative titles and decidedly less science-leaning subjects.  But then I walked in.

You would never know these magnificent creations were made of water, flour, glue and old newspapers.  They went from pretty to unique to down-right weird.

The first time I saw the green dachshund with giant red spots and a rat-like snout, I thought his beady eyes were following me.  When I looked at him a second time, I thought he’d moved.

After scaring myself into heart-attack country, I crawled back out and away from stationary yet uncannily life-like dogs.

I moved on to pleasanter things, like “Flying Jolie Girl” by Leata Judd, in which a blue girl with wings and a dreamy expression sits on a winged blue horse with red eyes that almost seemed out of place.

I also spent some time looking for eye-candy, like “Going with the Flow” by Judy Minter, a pretty piece that had wild rainbow waves and silver-gold coral, and “Charity Changes our Perspective: by Carry Thomas.

I stared at the last piece, “Charity,” for a long time, trying to understand the title.

Finally, I understood what the turtle carrying a chair on its shell was supposed to symbolize – note to the artist: pray forgive me if I’m wrong, I am merely a member of the generation raised by the internet – the chair, decorated as it was with a sea, and islands, and even a sky, was the world, and the turtle was carrying the world on its back, much like the Native American myth.

The turtle, which in a generalization, could be called “lowly” is transformed into something grand, something that allows the rest of us to live, by “holding the world.” In its generosity, it provides for us all.

After that puzzle of a piece, I moved on, only to have my eyes drawn to an intriguing figure of a dark woman with a blue bird on her shoulder.

Her eyes were pensive, and she was cradling a huge heart-shaped crevice in one hand. Inside the heart, was an abacus-like design, with large blocks that can are turned to show different sides. The title, “Anyway,” suits Rhea Griffin’s sculpture exactly.

Each block has a semi-negative situation, and the other side tells you to keep doing what you’re doing, “anyway.”

For example, “Give the world the best you have and you may get hurt. Give the world your best anyway.”

I can’t do justice to this incredible exhibit, but I can at least beg you to go and see it.  Don’t have time? Do it anyway.